Tiger-Man
jonasgrossmann:

new york 1970s @ nycnostalgia
sexyfemininegoddess:

Freaky !!!

sexyfemininegoddess:

Freaky !!!

lexbots:

the pumpkin king / sally

thehappysorceress:

danielmcnea:

Wanda Maximoff

Very nice!

thehappysorceress:

danielmcnea:

Wanda Maximoff

Very nice!

thesecretworldofwonderwoman:

"Eve and her roommate, Dot, were arrested this morning at holiday college!" “What’d they do - beat up a man?”
That seems like a perfectly reasonable conclusion to jump to.
Image from Wonder Woman #3, Feb/Mar issue, 1943, pg. 1A.

thesecretworldofwonderwoman:

"Eve and her roommate, Dot, were arrested this morning at holiday college!"
“What’d they do - beat up a man?”

That seems like a perfectly reasonable conclusion to jump to.

Image from Wonder Woman #3, Feb/Mar issue, 1943, pg. 1A.

superdames:

One time the men of the JSA were all working on different cases, so Wonder Woman gathered their girlfriends and had them dress up in costumes so they could catch the bad guy themselves.

-
She didn’t care that they had never been superheroes before.
(Except for Hawkgirl, who did this sort of thing all the time, but still was inexplicably not a member of the JSA for some reason).
—All-Star Comics #15 (1943) by Gardner Fox & Joe Gallagher

superdames:

One time the men of the JSA were all working on different cases, so Wonder Woman gathered their girlfriends and had them dress up in costumes so they could catch the bad guy themselves.

-

She didn’t care that they had never been superheroes before.

(Except for Hawkgirl, who did this sort of thing all the time, but still was inexplicably not a member of the JSA for some reason).

—All-Star Comics #15 (1943) by Gardner Fox & Joe Gallagher

fyeahwilliammoultonmarston:

daniphantomgone:

fyeahwilliammoultonmarston:

daniphantomgone:

fyeahwilliammoultonmarston:

While there’s life, there’s good in anybody!

No please DC, tell me more about how it makes sense that Diana would be OK with killing her enemies.

Just because someone HAS good and them and it would be best to take the time to bring it out, you might not be able to do so before they do something unspeakably evil.

Even though it’s preferable to save EVERYONE’S life, including the baddie.

Also, she may suffer from moments of weakness like if there’s a knife to Steve or her mother’s throat.

I mean I agree that iron clad no kill policies are hard to uphold IRL, and in fiction they can severely limit a story’s stakes and plotline. My problem with DC’s decision to have Diana kill was that it was purely for shock value, they had a big event going on and they needed to drum up interest so someone at DC decided they should have one of their heroes kill someone and they settled on Diana for no good reason other than they knew that of all their big names Wonder Woman’s characterization was the least respected and therefore the easiest to rewrite.

I’ll always be bitter about that Maxwell Lord storyline because it’s such a blatant reminder of how little DC editorial cares about Wonder Woman

I said that because I would LOVE to see some sort of compelling juxtaposition between her eagerness to reform baddies and a willingness to be pragmatic on taking the lives of baddies. And those two things don’t even need to be in conflict.
Imagine a genuine love, concern and want to help reform the villains precisely because she doesn’t want to be put in a situation where she may be compelled to take their life. (Nor does she want for someone else to do that.)

But I’ve yet to see a modernization of Diana’s want to reform villains. It’d be an interesting contrast to Batman and Superman who may just drop bag guys off at prison.

But no… that might require too much world-building in contrast to their own take on Wonder Woman.

Oh, I see.

Yeah I wish they’d bring back Reform Island, it’s sad how 70 years later it’s still so unheard of for a superhero to actually care about her rogues enough to actively oversee their rehabilitation, as opposed to just dumping them in Arkham Asylum or the Phantom Zone. There’s so much potential to explore, but all writers today seem to care about is the action scenes.

joeyart:

Since Its comic con week. here’s Wonder woman riding a 2 headed black rainbow pega unicorn while holding a 2 head lightsaber. the horse shoot out lighting from their unicorn too

joeyart:

Since Its comic con week. here’s Wonder woman riding a 2 headed black rainbow pega unicorn while holding a 2 head lightsaber. the horse shoot out lighting from their unicorn too

thehappysorceress:

redundantthinking:

It doesn’t mean I don’t care anymore. I don’t want to let you down, honest, but… but it just doesn’t hurt so bad anymore. You can understand that, can’t you? Look, I can give money to the city - they can hire more cops. Let someone else take the risk, but it’s different now! 

Please! I need it to be different now. I know I made a promise, but I didn’t see this coming. I didn’t count on being happy.

Please! Tell me that it’s okay…

Okay, so in order for me to talk about this scene, I need you to see the pictures and the words to it. I would have just subtitled it, but apparently my copy doesn’t come with that so we’ll just deal.

Yes, I need to talk about this scene. I absolutely do. I feel like, if you ever want to get Bruce Wayne or his issues, you need to at least see this scene in its full glory and digest it for what it is. 

For those who don’t know what this is from, it’s the movie made for the Batman: The Animated Series. It’s called the Mask of the Phantasm. The story is about a new vigilant called the Phantasm is killing crime bosses in Gotham and framing Batman for it. Meanwhile Andrea Beaumont, Bruce’s old love, returns and the movie details Bruce’s relationship with her and how it lead him to becoming Batman (also, I should note Andrea’s voice actress was also Lois’, so awesome).

The scene above comes about twenty minutes into the movie in a flashback. In it, a young, not yet Batman, Bruce goes to his parents grave in a state of conflict, unable to choose between a happy life with his girlfriend Andrea or the promise he made to his parents as a child. What results is Bruce pleading with their spirits to let him be at peace and have a normal life rather than give it up. 

And this is what should always have been Bruce major character conflict: whether he deserves happiness or not. We like to play pretend that Bruce’s real deal is that he’s always between the line that makes him a costumed monster or a hero, but it’s not. We know that Bruce would never give to impulse and kill a man: doing so would throw out the ideals and promise that was instilled in him upon Martha and Thomas’ deaths. Bruce could not and would not do so, but here we are with so many stories that like to think Bruce issue is that he is dark and violent and trying to not be a monster.

It’s not.

Let’s just put it out there now: Bruce has survivor’s guilt. (Among other things, but that is a post I am so not qualified to make)

Why else act like this, sacrifice himself for a promise no one else is making him keep, and pretty much tear himself into painful little pieces? We know that if Martha and Thomas were even somewhat like Bruce makes them out to be, they would never tell their son to self-destruct and become Batman. Here, Bruce is not begging with his parents so much as he is begging to himself and to fate.

I don’t want to let you down, honest, but… but it just doesn’t hurt so bad anymore." is a particular hard line (and I wish you could all hear it because Kevin Conroy is fucking amazing here; this might be his best). Bruce hates himself for going off his own plan because how dare he be happy. Happiness isn’t for men like him. We laugh at scenes like Bruce saying he hasn’t been happy since he was eight years old or when told he’s happy he says ‘What ever it is, I like it’, but the sad part is that Bruce honestly believes the things he says. 

In scenes like this we see Bruce for what he really feels under all the brooding and anger: he’s shaken with guilt over surviving the attack that killed his parents. Deep inside, Bruce believes he should be dead and by living, he has some how failed. This is nothing new with survivors guilt, especially with children; rationally they know they are not at fault, but the trauma makes them believe they are.

That’s the thing right there: Bruce thinks he should have taken the bullet and died. He didn’t, he let Martha and Thomas die, and now he has to bare an undeserving weight to make up for their deaths.

This is why I get really galled by people who say Bruce needs to shut up, move on, and ‘stop whining’ because he fucking can’t. For one: no one has the right to tell someone how long or how they mourn and if you do, you can go fuck yourself. For two: Bruce can’t move on because he doesn’t think he deserves it. He’s mentally still eight years old in his mind, watching his parents blood pool, hating himself for not being the one on the ground. 

I’m not saying Bruce should be excused for his actions, by the way. Bruce’s inner conflict and how he deals with it is his responsibility and suffer like he does makes him no less of a jackass to the people he hurts. Explaining shit does not excuse the harmful behavior he has later on.

What’s really important here is the kind of angst Bruce has here compared to what’s happening to him currently. This is true sorrow; this defeat. Bruce’s pain is apparent and it’s not violence, it’s through his exhaustion. Bruce is in his twenties and he’s already tired of living like this. So he pleads and he bargains and he gets down on his knees praying that he could have this one thing. We feel empathy for a man who truly wanted to throw himself away but finds love and hates himself for it. This is the Bruce that people care about. An broken down man; not the screaming lunatic who tells people they can not possibly understand his pain and then blames them for their own demise (and every time I see Bruce do that in comic canon, I want to pull my hair out because that SHOULDN’T BE BRUCE AT ALL IT REALLY FUCKING SHOULDN’T BUT IT HAS HAPPENED SO MANY TIMES THAT NOW IT IS AND JUST UUUGGHHHHHH).

This is Bruce’s conflict with Andrea, who was his sign to not be Batman, and it should be his issue with his family in the future. Bruce should not have an issue with them because they do not fit to his standards or can not understand him (which, fucking ha!) or believes that they will only weaken him.

Bruce’s issue with his children should be that they are each his new chance at happiness and he believes that he doesn’t deserve that. The same anguish we see in this scene should be the same one that Bruce feels when he hears Dick and Tim laughing or sees Cass pass by or watches Jason from a distance or has Damian in the Bat mobile being his usual self. They’re all the sign he needs to be happy and he thoroughly believes he shouldn’t have that.

For all the Bruce/Batman bashing I see and head-desk at, this post is a true joy.

ruckawriter:

What if Superman Punched You? by Vsauce3, found at Scientific American.